Tumkur (D)

  • Satellite images confirm illegal mining in State

    By Asha Krishnaswamy, DH News Service, Bangalore: The satellite images, which are part of the Lokayukta report on the mining activities in Bellary, Chitradurga and Tumkur districts, indicate that there is rampant illegal mining by many companies. The images are given by the National Remote Sensing Agency (NRSA), Hyderabad and processed as well as analysed by Karnataka State Remote Sensing Application Centre (KSRSAC).

  • Prioritization of sub-watersheds for sustainable development and management of natural resources

    The study area is one of the watersheds of North Pennar basin, covering an area of 570 km2 and lies between latitude 13

  • Violence erupts in Tumkur district

    People have been protesting against mining around temple at Honnebagi Equipment of mining companies set afire 40 farmers hurt in police lathi-charge Tumkur: C.N. Halli in Tumkur district was rocked by violence on Thursday when people set fire to the equipment of mining companies near a place of worship and farmers looted fertilizers from an outlet and damaged three buses, in different incidents. The people have been protesting against mining around the Abbige Malleshwara Temple at Honnebagi in C.N. Halli taluk.

  • Construction of roads in forest is against law

    DH News Service, Bangalore: Public Works Minister C M Udasi on Tuesday told the legislative assembly that the government will not construct roads in forests as it would be against the forest conservation legislation. However, basic amenities would be provided to the human settlements in the neighbourhood of villages.

  • Tigress, two cubs sighted' near Tumkur

    It is the third time in the last decade that forest staff have acknowledged the presence of tigers in the Devarayandurga State Reserve Forest Area, near Tumkur. Though the news makes the people of Tumkur proud, tiger conservationists remain skeptical over the claims. According to the Karnataka Wildlife Warden, T.V.N. Murthy, who is stationed here, a tigress and its two cubs were sighted by forest staff in the Devarayandurga State Reserve Forest recently, Mr. Murthy told The Hindu here on Thursday that on the night of February 19, T.V. Srinivas, Assistant Conservator of Forests, was returning after a night patrol in the forest. He saw a tigress and her two cubs resting between two ancient structures of the Ganesh Temple point on the periphery of the forest area, mid-way between Belgumba and Oordigere survey areas. Mr. Murthy said even as Mr. Srinivas stopped the jeep and shown the headlights on the tigress, the cubs escaped the glare. The tigress, however, was unperturbed. Mr. Srinivas and his deputy, M.N. Naik, who has worked in tiger sanctuaries at Bhadra and Anasi (Dandeli), tried to take a closer look. But the tiger gracefully slipped away into the darkness. Mr. Naik said the tigress seemed tired. The cubs, Mr. Naik said, were about 18 inches tall. Mr. Murthy said a team of Forest officials inspected the area the next morning for pugmarks. Although the pugmarks of all the three animals were sighted, they could not be documented because the dry weather had made the imprints unclear. Previous sightings Mr. Murthy recollected his tryst with a tiger in the same forest in 2000 and said: "Presence of tigers in the Devarayandurga State Reserve Forest area is reconfirmed.' He and his three-year-old son had just marched past a galloping tiger. It was a hair-rising experience for both of them. In 1998, Forest staff had sighted a tiger. Pugmarks of adult tigers had been found a couple of times in different parts of the forest. Tiger conservationists will have to dwell on the issue to establish the fact, he added. Ameen Ahmed, office-bearer of Nisarga, a wildlife nature club, however, has another viewpoint. He said that a circus group may have released the tigress and her cubs from their captive livestock, into the forest. Tiger conservationists, he said, were highly skeptical over the presence of tigers in the Devarayandurga forest area. "Nature lovers visiting the beautiful mountain ranges of the forest are constantly haunted by the presence of tigers,' he said, and added: "The Devarayandurga tiger mystery stands still. Tiger conservationists cannot just wish it away,' Centenary year The Devarayandurga State Reserve Forest will enter into its centenary in a few days from now. There are complaints about tree-felling along the Belgumba-Oordigere Road that passes right through the forest. Environmentalists have been demanding that the road be abandoned. The action will help avoid pilferage of forest wealth and wildlife. There are also complaints of unauthorised granite mining activity near the forest. The Government, which is believed to be preparing to celebrate the centenary year of the forest, must pay attention to stop illegal mining activity in the vicinity of the forest. The Government has also a duty to retrieve the 75-acre plot that was given to Tumkur University from the buffer zone of the forest. Though the Supreme Court invalidated the grant of the plot, the varsity has not returned the land, even after the Government provided it alternate site measuring 320 acres on the south-eastern part of Tumkur.

  • Interstate dirty dumpers

    Industrial units illegally dump hazardous waste in remote fields, often crossing state borders, to dodge the law and cut costs. <b><font class='UCASE'>ravleen kaur</font></b> travels to Tumkur and Chamrajnagar in Karnataka to find out how untreated wast

  • Online Water at a click

    <a href="http://www.indiawaterportal.org">http://www.indiawaterportal.org</a><br><br>Want to know how much rainfall your area received in 1910? In India, this data is difficult to obtain for the average citizen. But at this site you can get this information at a click. Datasets for various meteorological indicators between 1901 and 2002 is just one type of resource provided by http://www.indiawaterportal.org. <br>

  • Rise and fall of water managers

    Rise and fall of water managers

    Book>> Waternama, A Collection of Traditional Practices for Water Conservation and Management in Karnataka

  • Participation behaviour of indigenous people in extraction and marketing of non-timber forest products in the dry deciduous forests of South India

    This paper examines the role of non-timber forest products (NTFP) in the rural household economy and the demographic and economic factors determining the participation behaviour in forest gathering in the dry deciduous forests of Karnataka state.

  • Why only jatropha?

    Jatropha is not the only option for producing biodiesel. The Botanical Survey of India has identified over 300 species with non-edible, oil-rich seeds. As India has a chronic shortage of edible oils and imports it, non-edible oils are recommended for using in transport and other sectors. <br>

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